motorcycles, travel, friendship, respect… I may drift off into WTF-land at times so hang in there.

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Hidden Places

G’day

It’s fine to say “Hey! Lets head off to the black stump, its only 500km (300 mi)” but what do you see?

Endless black top, other vehicles, dust, maybe a wallaby grazing on the side of the road?

Sometimes it’s better to break the trip down in to two 250km (150 mi) runs and see all the little things along the way, stop and smell the roses as it were.

Such were most days on our recent holiday; we stopped at so many places that it would be difficult to catalogue them all.

This week I thought I’d share some places that deserve an honorable mention.

Grindelwald Swiss Village

Just north of Launceston is this little village called Grindelwald. Well its really a resort, but you can play putt-putt golf there and it has some awesome wood carvings set amongst the greens.

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That Sculpture Is Looking At The Ducks

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A Bit Shy – Aw Shucks

Richmond – Captured In Time

About 20 minutes north of Hobart is one of the finest examples of a town that has gone to great lengths to preserve its heritage. We initially went there for a quick look around and brunch but ended up staying all day.

The town is essentially as it was in 1872, there are very few if any modern buildings in the town.

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Anglican Church Of St Luke The Physician (Circa 1825)

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Richmond Bridge is the oldest stone span bridge still in use in Australia (Circa 1825)

Australia's Oldest Catholic Church, St Johns, Circa 1837

Australia’s Oldest Catholic Church, St Johns, Circa 1837

Sheffield – Town of Murals

Settled in 1859, the people of Sheffield were inspired by the story of Chemainus, a small Canadian town that rescued itself from ruin through mural art.

Sheffield’s first mural was painted in 1986 and now there are over 60 murals scattered around the town. Some are very, very good while others, not so much.

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Kentish Park Murals

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This Is By Far My Favorite Piece

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Sheffield Shed & Blacksmith Gallery

Campbell Town

Established in 1826, Campbell Town was one of four garrison towns along the Midland Highway linking Launceston to the north and Hobart to the south.

Today Campbell town is one of the only major rest areas along the Midland Highway. Blackburn Park lies right next to Red Bridge in the centre of town and is the oldest bridge on the national highway.

It’s also home to some really remarkable wood carvings.

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Blackburn Park – Campbell Town

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Stunning

Kate’s Berry Farm

We stopped here on the advice of our host in Launceston.

Kate grows all of her own berries and creates some mouth-watering jams and jellies from them. The Pillion and I enjoyed some of her home-made ice-cream and chocolates while taking a break from riding

The view to Coles Bay was breathtaking.

Kate's Berry Farm - Coles Bay

Kate’s Berry Farm – Coles Bay

Longley Hotel

Not only does The Longley Hotel have a huge axe out front and an eccentric collection of machinery memorabilia out in the beer garden, it puts on a great meal and live music too.

We stopped here on our ride down to Southport from Hobart one afternoon.

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Now THAT’S An Axe

Latrobe – Pig Island

We rode out to The Australian Axemen’s Hall Of Fame for breakfast one morning and stumbled across this pristine park across the road.

The park lies on the banks of the Mersey River and has a walking trail around its perimeter and surrounds. The walk was just long enough for us to work off the bacon and eggs we had just devoured.

Bert Campbell Memorial Park

Pig Island

Hobart – Franklin wharf

Hobart is full of history and one of the places we spent a bit of time at was the Franklin Wharf. The Wharf is teaming with activity with fishing boats, ferries and pleasure craft coming and going all the time.

There are also a lot of art type stores and first class eateries scattered around the wharf too. One could get very fat in Hobart just from eating too much, Especially at The Drunken Admiral.

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Bronze Statue – Commemorating Explorer Louis Bernacchi

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Great Name For A Restaurant

Launceston – Tamar River

The Tamar River isn’t really a river, it’s actually an estuary formed by the North and South Esk Rivers. That becomes irrelevant when you realise how close it is to Launceston and how much wildlife it supports.

I managed to snap this picture of a seagull in flight while on a cruise up the river.

Tamar River Wildlife

Tamar River Wildlife

Wrapping Up

In case you’re wondering, I’m not using any whiz-bang camera’s in any of my photography.

Most of the photos I take are with a Samsung Galaxy S4, a Contour Roam II helmet camera and a Nikon L-120 digital camera (when I remember to take it with me!)

At the beginning of this post I said these places deserve an honorable mention. The reason for this, is because I have so few photos from these places, and that’s entirely my fault.

Either I forgot to take a camera, or I was just so engrossed in looking around and feeding my eyes and I totally forgot to take photos.

Untill next week

Cheers


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23 responses

  1. Awesome photos. While I loved the wood carvings, those murals are even better. Thanks for sharing.

    Liked by 1 person

    May 25, 2016 at 5:42 AM

    • Thank you 🙂

      There is a wall that is being carved out of local timber consisting of 100 panels 1m wide x 3m high somewhere in northern Tasmania. I really wanted to see it but missed it this time. It is so intricate that the artist has included the wrinkles in a hand and face.
      I reckon you’d like to see that. Thank is for commenting.

      Like

      May 25, 2016 at 6:58 AM

  2. This is such a cool post man, no matter what equipment you used, you captured so many cool moments – really well done mate. Just beautiful.

    Liked by 2 people

    May 25, 2016 at 11:13 AM

  3. Great tour, Ghost! Richmond seems like a real storybook village, and those Sheffield murals are just gorgeous.

    One of my favorite places in eastern Nevada rescued itself from the collapse of precious metals mining by converting its steam railyard into a working museum and painting murals all over town.

    Oh, and nice touch with the new watermark (unless it’s old, and then shame on me for not noticing before). 😉

    Like

    May 25, 2016 at 2:58 PM

    • Thanks Ry.

      I really like when a town does things like that. There’s this place about 100 miles from me called Mooball, where the locals have painted everything to look like a friesian cow. Quirky for sure but a nice touch.

      The watermark is new… and is evolving still not quite happy with it… Working on it.

      Liked by 1 person

      May 30, 2016 at 7:48 PM

  4. NicMen

    Nice pics Adam! I’ll throw my 6D away (can’t compete with your photos!)

    Like

    May 25, 2016 at 4:19 PM

    • Thank you Nicolas. Years ago I had a Ricoh XRP. Sometimes I wish I still had it because it had so many features on it. The things I miss most are the bulb multiple exposure and timelaps settings it had. Now they were some great photos

      Like

      May 27, 2016 at 6:45 AM

  5. Excellent photos mate, been to several of those places myself. I love sheffield its a great little spot overshadowed by Mt Roland in the background

    Liked by 1 person

    May 27, 2016 at 10:49 PM

    • Yep, lots of great little places to immerse yourself in… I really enjoyed Richmond… maybe because I’m a bit of an Australian history buff, not sure.

      Regardless the place really resonated with me.

      Like

      May 30, 2016 at 8:05 PM

  6. Bob

    I too, liked the murals and woodcarving photos best, although all were excellent. Well done Ghost!

    Liked by 1 person

    May 31, 2016 at 7:33 AM

  7. What a beauty Tassie is.

    Liked by 1 person

    May 31, 2016 at 10:13 AM

    • Yep, and for such a small state (when compared to other Australian states) it sure does pack in a lot of stuff to see and do.

      Like

      May 31, 2016 at 10:14 AM

      • It’s so fresh there, not like Sydney… Unfortunately I did not explore enough when I visited. Lucky you! And the roads for a ride seemed just amazing!

        Liked by 1 person

        May 31, 2016 at 10:21 AM

        • I have some much more to share about Tasmania… I’m a little concerned though, that I’ll bore my followers :-/.

          Perhaps I need to break it up a bit with other stuff.

          Like

          May 31, 2016 at 10:24 AM

          • I think go for it! Those who want to read it definitely will, and I’m sure you got a lot of different stuff to share. The photos help too!

            Liked by 2 people

            May 31, 2016 at 11:13 AM

          • I fully agree with imaginaryfractals: Moto-blog reading is vicarious living. Though I would love to ride Australia and Tasmania, there’s a really good chance it ain’t gonna happen. Reading your accounts (and others’) is the next best thing, especially with that common denominator, the love of riding. Feel free to share on, Ghost friend. 🙂

            Liked by 1 person

            May 31, 2016 at 12:36 PM

  8. Fantastic choice of neat places, and great photos! I too use mostly my phone, and the pics certainly come out good enough for me, lol. I do love when towns have dead trees carved, rather than just cut down…and the murals were very nice! 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    June 3, 2016 at 7:10 AM

    • I sometimes wonder if the phone/ camera will supersede the pocket camera, Lynne.

      They’re getting so good in clarity and features, I think they are becoming redundant, and you always have one with you so you never forget it.

      Sure they wont replace cameras like the 6D Nick is using but they work pretty well for “happy snaps” 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      June 3, 2016 at 8:09 AM

  9. Pingback: That’s a Wrap – Three Weeks Just Isn’t Enough. | EXPERIMENTAL GHOST

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